NIH To Limit Money To Well-Funded Investigators?

Dr. Sally Rockey, Deputy Director for Extramural Research at NIH, posted in her blog “Rock Talk” about the possibility of NIH limiting funds to already funded investigators. Decisions were to be made at September Council, so we should be getting some information about this program soon. From the original blog post:

“It’s been three months since I discussed how, during May Advisory Council meetings, NIH would pilot a new Special Council Review process for particularly well-funded applicants (NOTE that they have now dropped the amount to $1M in directs to trigger a council review). Since that time, we ran the pilot and carefully considered all the great feedback we received from Advisory Council members and staff. We are now ready to implement the final policy on Special Council Review.

“The new special review process will be in effect for the 2013 fiscal year, beginning with September 2012 Council meetings. The new policy will provide additional consideration of new and renewal applications from well-supported investigators who currently receive more than $1 million or more in direct costs. I want to remind you that this policy does not cap the total amount of funds an investigator may receive from NIH, but rather is a special review to complement existing NIH policies that require monitoring all investigators’ activities for overlapping support, and determining whether additional funds should be awarded to well-supported investigators.”

For the full blog post and all comments, click here: NIH Extramural Nexus.

How The Continuing Resolution Affects The NIH Budget– And Your Grant Award

The NIH issued this announcement yesterday:

“The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), including NIH, operates under a Continuing Resolution (CR) (H. J. Resolution 117) that was signed by President Obama as Public Law 112-175 on September 28, 2012.  The CR continues government operations through March 27, 2013 at the FY 2012 level plus 0.6 percent.

“Until FY 2013 appropriations are enacted, NIH will issue non-competing research grant awards at a level below that indicated on the most recent Notice of Award (generally up to 90% of the previously committed level). This is consistent with our practice during the CRs of FY 2006 – 2012. Upward adjustments to awarded levels will be considered after our FY 2013 appropriations are enacted but NIH expects institutions to monitor their expenditures carefully during this period.  All legislative mandates that were in effect in FY 2012 remain in effect under the CR, including the salary limitation set at Executive Level II of the Federal Pay Scale ($179,700), which was effective with grant awards with an initial Issue Date on or after December 23, 2011 (see NOT-OD-12-034 and NOT-OD-12-035).”

For grant applications that have just been reviewed, look for a delay (possibly lengthy) in funding decision pending the FY13 Appropriation (unless you are lucky enough to have a priority score well within the funding range.) For those in the gray zone (perhaps 7-16%, depending on your funding mechanism and your ESI status), you can expect a lengthy delay in the funding decision. Discuss your specific circumstances with your program officer.