Healthy People 2020 Leading Health Indicators: Progress Update

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The federal government has issued an interim report this month showing positive progress on Leading Health Indicators. The Healthy People 2020 Leading Health Indicators (LHIs) are a select subset of Healthy People 2020 objectives chosen to communicate high-priority health issues and actions that can be taken to address them. There are 26 LHIs organized into 12 topics. These include Access to Health Services (e.g., number of people with insurance), Clinical Preventive Services (e.g., screening for hypertension, diabetes, colorectal cancer), Environmental Quality (exposure to second-hand smoke), Injury and Violence, Maternal-Infant-Child Health, and Mental Health (suicide rate), to name a few. On April 8, 2014, Healthy People 2020 unveiled a report highlighting the progress made within each of these LHIs through the first third of the decade.

As of March 2014, progress generally has been positive toward achieving the HP2020 targets for the 26 LHIs, with 14 indicators (53.9%) having either met their target or shown improvement:

  • 4 indicators (15.4%) have met or exceeded their Healthy People 2020 targets.
  • 10 indicators (38.5%) are improving.
  • 8 indicators (30.8%) show little or no detectable change.
  • 3 indicators (11.5%) are getting worse.
  • 1 indicator (3.8%) has only baseline data.

About Healthy People

Healthy People provides science-based, 10-year national objectives for improving the health of all Americans. For 3 decades, Healthy People has established benchmarks and monitored progress over time in order to:

  • Encourage collaborations across communities and sectors.
  • Empower individuals toward making informed health decisions.
  • Measure the impact of prevention activities.

Click here to read more about the federal Healthy People initiative.

Dr. Bouvier Interviewed on Grantsmanship for the Journal Nature

We invite you to read Dr. Bouvier’s comments on grantsmanship in an article in the latest issue of the journal Nature.

The article, entitled, “Impact: Pack a Punch”, discusses the importance of impact in proposed research projects. It included comments from scientists and funding agency administrators from a wide variety of scientific fields in numerous countries. Dr. Bouvier was the only professional grantwriter who participated in the article.

Nature, a prominent international journal published weekly, remains one of the few journals to publish research spanning all of the scientific disciplines. It is one of the most widely cited journals in science worldwide.

Dr. Bouvier provided permission for her information to be translated for their Japanese and Arabic editions.