Update on the New NIH Biosketch Format

Credit: adamr at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

There are changes pending for the NIH biosketch format, and I think it is good news for NIH grantees. The new NIH biosketch format will allow up to five pages for the entire biosketch, as opposed to the current four-page limit. Even better, rather than simply listing publications, the new format will give researchers the opportunity to highlight the magnitude and significance of the scientific advances associated with their discoveries and the specific role they played in those findings.

Grantees will be permitted to describe up to five of their most significant contributions to science, the influence of their contributions on their scientific field, and any subsequent effects of these contributions on the fields of medicine or technology. This will help reviewers better focus on the applicant’s most important contributions to science. Researchers also will be able to include a link to their complete list of publications in SciENcv or My Bibliography.

NIH recently launched a new round of pilot tests (here and here) to make sure the new format will work well for both applicants and reviewers. The pilot will involve surveys of both reviewers and applicants to help NIH fine tune the application instructions and guidance to reviewers. NIH plans to roll out the modified biosketch for all grant applications received for FY 2016 funding and beyond (which generally refers to applications submitted in early 2015).

To learn more about the NIH’s new Biosketch format click *here*

 

Dr. Bouvier Interviewed on Grantsmanship for the Journal Nature

We invite you to read Dr. Bouvier’s comments on grantsmanship in an article in the latest issue of the journal Nature.

The article, entitled, “Impact: Pack a Punch”, discusses the importance of impact in proposed research projects. It included comments from scientists and funding agency administrators from a wide variety of scientific fields in numerous countries. Dr. Bouvier was the only professional grantwriter who participated in the article.

Nature, a prominent international journal published weekly, remains one of the few journals to publish research spanning all of the scientific disciplines. It is one of the most widely cited journals in science worldwide.

Dr. Bouvier provided permission for her information to be translated for their Japanese and Arabic editions.

Are R03s and R21s Disappearing from NIH?

In a previous post I reported that NIDDK is the latest IC to pull out of the R21 program. My colleagues and I have been discussing (read: bemoaning) the demise of the small grant programs at NIH for some time, so it got me wondering about the actual numbers. Below is a table I created of data on the total number of awards and total funding under the R01, R03, and R21 programs over the past ten years. Below the table is a link to three line graphs I created from these data.

The R03 program appears to have peaked in 2004, with 1,632 awards and about $131.3M in funding. That number has been trending downward ever since, with 2010 numbers dipping to 1,058 awards and $87.3M in funding. Both of these R03 2010 numbers are about 65% of what they were at their peak in 2004.

The R21 program looks like it peaked in 2008 (3,649 applications and $678M in funding), with the numbers trending down since.

The number of R01 awards peaked in 2004 and have gone down each year since, dropping from 29,060 (2004) to 26,752 (2010). However the total R01 funding has remained relatively constant over the same time period and was actually at its highest in ten years in 2010 ($10.6B).

 

Click here for line graphs comparing R03 and R21

 

  R01- # awards R01- total funding R03- # awards R03- total funding R21- number awards R21- total funding
2001 26,173 $8,092,593,805 1250 $85,588,331 1279 $222,627,134
2002 27,568 $8,985,081,987 1378 $100,859,126 1822 $334,251,476
2003 28,698

$9,742,052,935 1506 $119,237,600 2464 $463,441,579
2004 29,060 $10,176,053,099 1632

$131,256,249

2934 $565,855,342
2005 28,622 $10,288,217,875 1603

$129,112,877

3056 $590,944,052
2006 28,192 $10,121,779,877 1409

$110,742,609

3126 $599,204,776
2007 27,850 $10,045,800,665 1430

$107,986,148

3453 $676,573,619

2008 27,012 $9,956,033,585 1479

$107,464,019

3649 $736,213,063

2009 26,580 $10,261,795,174 1284

$99,073,147

3271 $678,182,707

2010 26,752 $10,641,893,906 1058

$87,331,891

3124 $658,330,834

Source: NIH Reporter website. Total # awards excludes number of awards for noncompeting supplements 

Click here for line graphs comparing R03 and R21