New Webinar: NIH Submission Strategies — Register Now!

You have a cool idea for a research project, now what? The second in my new webinar series addresses NIH Submission Strategies. As a person who works on NIH submissions full time, I know there are certain steps you can take before you write a single word that correlate with better scores and outcomes.

Some of these steps include the following: taking the time to understand the priorities of the stakeholders involved, including reading Appropriations Reports; learning which projects are already in the NIH funding portfolio to ascertain how you might adjust your idea to fit in; identifying multiple ICs (not just an obvious one) and shopping around different versions of your Specific Aims to gauge enthusiasm; building a relationship with the all-important Program Officer, who will help guide questions related to study design, FOA, ESI status, and study section; and understanding the review process and audience before you write.

Your team will invest hundreds of hours in your submission. Why not spend 90 minutes learning some tried-and-true strategies to use before you write that will optimize your chance of success? I probably work on more NIH submissions in a month than you will work on across your entire career. I’ve helped clients land over $200 million in federal funds, and I can help strengthen your submission and improve your grantsmanship as well.

REGISTER FOR ALL 3 WEBINARS AND SAVE!
Bundle with two more webinars and save! Three webinars for $499.

Read about all three webinars, including “Mistakes Commonly Made on NIH Grant Applications” and “How To Write The Specific Aims.”

NIH Submission Strategies

Who: Essential for grantees planning to submit an R01, R21, or R03 in an upcoming cycle, and the senior faculty and administrators who advise them.
When: Wednesday 11 February 2015, 11am-12:30pm EST or
Thursday 19 February 2015, 11am-12:30pm EST
Cost: $199; Or register for all three webinars this month for $499
Takeaways: At the end of this 90-minute session, participants will be able to:

1. Utilize the Reporter website to identify their niche in the funding portfolio
2. Identify likely ICs, POs, and FOAs
3. Write several drafts of their Aims to send to POs
4. Choose the most appropriate IC, FOA, and study section with PO guidance

REGISTER NOW!

Dr. Bouvier Interviewed on Grantsmanship for the Journal Nature

We invite you to read Dr. Bouvier’s comments on grantsmanship in an article in the latest issue of the journal Nature.

The article, entitled, “Impact: Pack a Punch”, discusses the importance of impact in proposed research projects. It included comments from scientists and funding agency administrators from a wide variety of scientific fields in numerous countries. Dr. Bouvier was the only professional grantwriter who participated in the article.

Nature, a prominent international journal published weekly, remains one of the few journals to publish research spanning all of the scientific disciplines. It is one of the most widely cited journals in science worldwide.

Dr. Bouvier provided permission for her information to be translated for their Japanese and Arabic editions.

Our Client Receives $19 Million NCI Contract Proposal

We would like to congratulate our client on receiving a contract from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to become the Biospecimen Core Resource (BCR) providing biospecimen processing services for The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The contract, which is for $19 million dollars over two years, was the sole award. Dr. Margaret Bouvier served as lead writer on the contract proposal development team at ITECS Innovative Consulting.

The Cancer Genome Atlas is a signature program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The goal of the project is to catalog genetic mutations responsible for cancer using genome sequencing and bioinformatics. Scientists perform cutting-edge genetic testing of tumors from tens of thousands of patients and dozens of different cancers, thereby improving the ability to diagnose, treat, and prevent the disease. The BCR for TCGA  is central to the process of acquiring both tumor and normal tissue samples and their accompanying clinical information from contributing medical and research centers. BCR functions include analyzing all specimens to ensure they meet rigorous quality standards for each tumor type and ensuring that the clinical information for each sample is available. Once the optimal specimens are examined and processed, the BCR distributes the DNA and RNA extracted from the specimens to researchers throughout the national TCGA research network.