Center for Scientific Review’s “Peer Review Notes” is out!

I’m emerging briefly from my grantwriting fog to remind people that the NIH’s Center For Scientific Review, which oversees the peer review portion of the extramural grants, publishes a newsletter three times a year. The latest issue is out. If you don’t already subscribe, I strongly encourage you to do so.

I’ll be posting more when I emerge from the hell of impending Cycle II grant deadlines. (WHY do so many people apply for Cycle II grants? Does anyone know?)

How Will The FY11 Appropriation Affect NIH Funding?

The NIH has issued a notice stating how the FY11 appropriation will affect funding. The Appropriation Act for FY11 allocates $30.9 billion to NIH, which is nearly 1% less than the amount NIH received in FY10 ($31.2B).  As a result, “Modular and non-modular research grants, from all ICs, with the single exception of NCI, will be reduced to 1 percent below the FY 2010 award level.  Inflationary adjustments for recurring costs on non-competing research grants in FY 2012 and beyond will be set at the 2 percent level, calculated based on the adjusted FY 2011 level.”  The policy does not apply to K awards, SBIR/STTRs, and NRSAs. However, “Awards that have already been made in FY 2011 which are impacted by this policy may be revised.”

As for NCI, research grants will be reduced to 3% below FY10 levels. “Inflationary adjustments for recurring costs on non-competing research grants in FY 2012 and beyond will be set at the 2 percent level, calculated based on the adjusted FY 2011 level.” (Does not apply to Ks, SBIR/STTRs, nor NRSAs.)  Again, awards made in FY11 may be revised based on this policy.

NIH anticipates that its ICs will award 9,050 new and competing Research Project Grants (RPGs). It will be up to each IC to apportion its extramural grant money in accordance with their funding priorities. (Future inflationary adjustments for recurring costs on competing grants will be 2%, and awards made in FY11 may be revised.)

New Investigators submitting R01 equivalent awards will be funded at rates comparable to those for established investigators submitting new R01 equivalent awards. NRSAs will get a 2% increase on stipends.

Science Funding In The FY11 Budget (NIH, NSF, CDC, FDA, NIST, DOE)

We now know that NIH will receive $30.7B for FY11. While this funding level is hardly a dream scenario for research scientists, given the current economic situation we are all heaving a collective sigh of relief (for now.) Once you have wiped the sweat from your brow, your next thought may be to wonder how other science agencies fared in FY11.

Like NIH, other science agencies were spared deep cuts for the time being. Jennifer Zeitzer, director of legislative relations for Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, is quoted as saying, “Considering the overall level of cuts, the impact of the federal science agencies of interest to FASEB was fairly minimal.” How minimal? Here are the numbers:

NSF $6.9B for FY11 ($53M less than FY10, $551 less than the Administration’s recommendation for FY11, $307M above the House recommendation.)

CDC $5.66B for FY11 ($730M below FY10, $681M above the House recommendation.)

FDA $2.452B for FY11 (4% above FY10, 14% above the House recommendation.)

NIST $752M for FY11 ($55M higher than the level proposed by the House)

Department of Energy’s Office of Science $4.88B for FY11 (up $866M over the House level.)

DHHS agencies must submit spending details within 30 days of the enactment of an appropriation bill (NSF within 60 days), so we will know within the next month or two how the agencies will apportion the FY11 monies for the remaining six months of the federal year.